Lime School

Innocence

Emil Sayahi
Sandra Dunstan-Hoover
AP English Language and Composition
10 October 2019

Innocence

  Tabula rasa, a ‘blank slate’: the human mind at birth. Immediately, it begins observing, flooding itself with knowledge, processing bit by bit. An objective observer, a child is, briefly, untainted by biases, immune from any ties or connections that aim to animate its limbs. Each agent of man is created disconnected from the greater mind of society. The world is theirs, and theirs alone, synchronized with their perception of it. However, as time inches forward, loneliness grows, a need for belonging arises. Having completed the initial step of maturation, the child is thrust into a greater institution, a subject to men, they themselves slaves, rather than a contributor to oneself.
  One of the first steps in raising a child is to teach it to communicate. Placing it into an environment with others is an efficient way to achieve this. Exposing the human to organized recreation and performance will allow for the transmission of ideas and thoughts between agents, making each node more adaptive and likely to conform, passing data through the network.
  Second, correct the agent, as it will malfunction. One design flaw in humanity’s conformist nature is its ability to be manipulated by emotion. Younger agents will focus on the more illogical, emotional aspects of a message, manipulating the data they pass on. To resolve the data loss, the network must engage reinforcement protocols to ensure an individual node will prefer to retain and communicate a message as accurately as possible.
  Lastly, an agent must be made capable of production. Its ability to produce for the network, comparable to ants producing for their colony or bees producing for their hive, is the driving force behind human success. A variety of layered networks of ranging scales, from relationships to continental cultures, need organized production. Agents may choose to express their own thoughts, creating their own networks, or they make choose to function as nodes, producing to further the general will. To produce, it must be able to discuss with other agents to resolve conflicts and reach conclusions. A failure to do so will result in the removal of the agent from a network, leading to its termination.
  Humans must create and communicate. As a social species, the only one with complex language and the ability to inquire from others information it does not have, humanity’s greatest strength has been as an organized creator. Institutions use the combined minds of many to achieve focused, specific achievements on grand scales. Art, culture, countries, and families: all mediums to spread knowledge and organize labor efforts. Conforming, however, requires the dismissal of an objective perception of the world, and replacement with a subjective interpretation of it. Once a person has become dependent on the general will, they have lost innocence.


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